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Pomegranate Hummus


Pomegranate Hummus

I have been a hummus fan since I was about….19 years old. Before then, I had no idea this delicious stuff even existed. My first bite was UNREAL. 

Where in the hell has this been my whole entire life? WHY has no one introduced this to me before? I was full of repetitive, yet truly unnecessary, questions while I inhaled this creamy delicious gift from the Heavens. I was at a small, family owned place called Naji’s in Birmingham, and I quickly discovered that they nailed this, along with their popular pita bread, Tabbouleh and Baba Ganoush. 

Needless to say, I was quite the Naji’s fan from then on.

Pomegranate Hummus

At that point, I decided to dig in my pockets and pay 10 damn dollars for some tahini and make my own hummus.  🤦🏻‍♀️

Yes, I’m bitching about the cost of tahini, but seriously it lasts for a long time unless your a huge tahini fan.

So, my first batch of hummus was a chunky mess that just would not become smooth, and I could not get the taste right to save my life. After a few batches, I got close, but I did NOT get anywhere near close to the consistency I was trying so damn hard to achieve. There was something I was missing, and I would miss for a couple of years until I ran across an article that discussed peeling garbanzo beans.

That’s when it hit me – those little bastards need to be naked.

Once I started peeling them, my hummus game started getting better. The garbanzo bean skins make it difficult to get a super smooth, creamy hummus. 

Peeling them isn’t a big deal at all. If you’re using canned, drain and rinse them, put the in a pan of water and boil for about 5 minutes, drain and let them cool. Once you start handling them, the skins fall right off. 

If you’re one of those people that like to peel and pop, this will be your new jam. Except for the fact that there’s no popping here. It almost becomes addictive, like peeling skin after a sunburn. I know, gross. But you all do it just like me and you know it.

Over the past few years, I’ve made many, many batches. I think one of the mistakes that some people make while making hummus is being afraid of lemon. You cannot be afraid of lemon here. As far as the consistency, it’s gonna be thick. Thick as shit. You need to drizzle olive oil in towards the end while the food processor is going, and test it, then add more water, and oil, if needed. Just add a little at a time, then process. 

You don’t necessarily have to use water as a thinner. Chicken stock would work, too, but keep in mind it may impact flavor. Depending on your hummus, you can add liquid that will accent the flavor and thin it out.

With this Pomegranate Hummus, I added pomegranate juice for flavor. I wasn’t sure how it would taste, or how much pomegranate juice it would take to make the flavor enough to be impactful.

I chose pomegranate because, well, it’s in season, I adore it, and my hummus needed something different added to it. THIS is now my new favorite. It’s SO DAMN GOOD! You have to make it. I’ll be posting a tutorial video very soon about cutting a pomegranate and removing the arils.

I’ve made Black Bean Chipotle Hummus, Pineapple Serrano Hummus, Roasted Poblano and Corn Hummus, Sesame Wasabi Hummus – Can you tell I love hummus?

Chickpeas love other flavors; they’re so versatile. What’s your favorite hummus??

Here’s your printable –

Pomegranate Hummus

Pomegranate Hummus

Yield: 6

Hummus with real pomegranate juice and pomegranate arils. SO. GOOD.

Ingredients

  • 1 pomegranate
  • 28 oz can chickpeas, drained and rinsed
  • 1/4 cup tahini
  • 1 tsp white vinegar
  • 1 lemon, juiced
  • 1 tsp cumin
  • 2 tbsp salt
  • 2 cloves garlic
  • 1/4 cup cup olive oil
  • 1/3 cup pomegranate juice from the plastic bag arils are in.

Instructions

  1. Cut pomegranate and remove the arils, place in a plastic zip lock bag and refrigerate for at least 2 hours.
  2. Place the chickpeas in a medium sauce pan, covered with water and vinegar, bring to a boil, reduce heat to medium low and let simmer for about 5 minutes.
  3. Rinse them with cold water. You should start to see them shedding their little shells by now.
  4. Using your fingers with gentle touch, carefully rub peas between your fingers and the skins will come off.
  5. Combine the chickpeas in a food processor with the rest of the ingredients except the pomegranate arils, scraping down the sides a little at a time as you pulse.
  6. If needed, add more water, lemon oil, pomegranate or salt to desired taste.
  7. Garnish with pomegranate arils, chickpeas and olive oil.
  8. Enjoy!

Notes

Letting the pomegranate arils stay in the fridge will allow juice to accumulate in the bottom of the bag.

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